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The Paradox Of Plenty

What if we don’t need so many people working anymore? What shall we do with all our leisure time? Can we afford it?

In the US, just three out of 10 workers are needed to produce and deliver the goods we consume. Everything we extract, grow, design, build, make, engineer and transport – down to brewing a cup of coffee in a restaurant kitchen and carrying it to a customer’s table – is done by roughly 30 percent of the country’s workforce.

Living with Abundance And The Embarrassment of Riches?

What if we don’t need so many people working anymore?  What shall we do with all our leisure time?  Can we afford it?  What’s the solution?  J. Bradford Delong poses some of these questions and more in an article at the Global Times.

In the US, just three out of 10 workers are needed to produce and deliver the goods we consume. Everything we extract, grow, design, build, make, engineer and transport – down to brewing a cup of coffee in a restaurant kitchen and carrying it to a customer’s table – is done by roughly 30 percent of the country’s workforce.

The rest of us spend our time planning what to make, deciding where to install the things we have made, performing personal services, talking to each other and keeping track of what is being done, so that we can figure out what needs to be done next. And yet, despite our obvious ability to produce much more than we need, we do not seem to be blessed with an embarrassment of riches. One of the great paradoxes of our time is that workers and middle-class households continue to struggle in a time of unparalleled plenty.

See more at Global Times website.

By ingkavet

Andrew Ingkavet is an educator, author and entrepreneur.
His belief that learning a musical instrument builds skills vital to success in life has led to a thriving music school in Brooklyn, NY. Internationally, Andrew helps music teachers with the Musicolor Method, an online curriculum/training as well as a 5 star-rated book,The Game of Practice: with 53 Tips to Make Practice Fun. He is also founder of 300 Monks, a music licensing company.

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